March 7, 2009

FROM: CHARLIE MCCORMACK and CAROLYN MILES



Dear Board Members,



Just wanted to provide another update on the situation in Sudan:



- As per our earlier communication, all operations have been suspended under the revoking of our registration to work in the country in response to the ICC ruling on the President Al-Bashir as a war criminal



- The impact on humanitarian programs in Darfur will be very great - we were up to this week feeding close to 500,000 people, delivering medical care and supplies to tens of thousands, and managing large numbers of schools and health facilities in the displaced persons camps of West Darfur. In all we have been reaching over 1 million people. As one of our largest programs around the world, the number of children and family members impacted, staff employed, and assets under management for this program is very large. At this point there are negotiations underway to try to move these programs under WFP and UN offices but it is doubtful the capacity will be there to continue the programs uninterrupted. We are also speaking to Catholic Relief Services and World Vision as there have not been any faith-based agencies yet affected.



- We are working all channels both here in the US and in Sudan and the region on the impact of this action on the humanitarian crisis in Darfur and the reversal of the action. The likelihood for significant unrest in the country will grow as the number of days passes without delivery of critical programs and services. However, it appears this is purely a political decision made by the Government of Sudan and as such will be hard to reverse.
Nashville, TN, March 5, 2009 - Officials from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), (Princeton, New Jersey) and Meharry Medical College today announced the establishment of a national health policy center at Meharry Medical College. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Center for Health Policy at Meharry Medical College aims to bring diversity of perspectives and collaborative approaches to national health policy discussions. The creation of the Center comes as the nation's ethnic and racial diversity is rapidly increasing, and will be guided by the principle that sound health policy must be grounded in the experience of the people it represents.


BY: CAROLE BARTOO

2/20/2009 - 

A unique meeting held here late last week was the first step in bringing Vanderbilt into a consortium of the highest-level international aid organizations working to control the spread of HIV.

Sten Vermund, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health (VIGH) hosted the consultative meeting with UNICEF (the United Nations Children's Fund) and its partners to examine programs meant to halt transmission of HIV from mothers to their infants in the world's poorest regions.

For more: go to -- http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/reporter/index.html?ID=7033

 

ONE Partners with CARE for "A Powerful Noise"

March 5, 6:30CT: Green Hills 16

Feb 26 2009

Please join ONE and our partners on Thursday, March 5 for a nationwide event featuring the acclaimed documentary “A Powerful Noise,” followed by a live broadcast of a town hall discussion with Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright; actress and activist Natalie Portman; CARE president and CEO Dr. Helene Gayle; CARE advocate and Marie Claire contributing editor Christy Turlington Burns; and New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof.

The Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health (VIGH) had the unique honor of hosting an international discussion of health care systems to halt the transmission of HIV from African mothers to their babies last week. Director Sten Vermund hosted members of UNICEF (the United Nations Children's Fund), the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNAIDS in a two-day workshop last week to determine the effectiveness of prevention programs in developing countries, the effects of early weaning on HIV-free child survival, and the effects of HIV programs on improving maternal care. This was a wonderful example of how Nashville's global health expertise, efforts, and relationships hold deep influence in the international community.

 Forum   Speakers   Schedule   Registration   Location  

Would you like to learn more about the global health projects taking place through the work of organizations right here in Tennessee? Join the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health (VIGH) on February 27th, 2009 at the Scarritt Bennett Center for the first annual Global Health Forum for Middle Tennessee. 

Sustainable projects involve many factors that overlap and affect one another. Teamwork and a strategic approach can make the difference in success. The 2009 Tennessee Global Health Forum is an opportunity for organizations from throughout the region to come together in an effort to combine forces and share our current projects.

Join us in learning effective approaches toward sustainability and exploring the potential for new partnerships.  Click on Forum, Speakers, Schedule, Registration and Location above for additional information.

Who should come?

Regional individuals/organizations involved in global health or related development.

Why should you come?

The Global Health Forum will provide the perfect setting for networking and collaboration between and among community groups. This setting will enable the identification of existing and evolving approaches to public health, facilitate a dialogue that encourages efficient use of resources and expertise, and allow groups to better promote themselves, their issues and Nashville itself. The Forum will also give VIGH the chance to formally introduce itself and to explain the Institute’s holistic approach to global health, its interest in creating partnerships for sustainability and its availability as a community resource and partner.

What will you take away?

The Global Health Forum will provide participants with new ideas/tools that can be put to work right away, the first steps toward a regional global health coalition, and the opportunity to use the Tennessee Global Health Database as a networking tool.

As you may know, Bill Gates is circulating his first annual letter about his work at the Gates Foundation. It provides candid insight into the Foundation’s work and their plans for the future, discussing the progress and shortcomings of initiatives in which they have invested time and resources. Read and download the full letter here.  This is the first in the series of letters Gates has committed to writing each year. 

Dear friends,

As we've come to know, Julianne Moore is one of Save the Children's most dedicated and passionate artist ambassadors, with visits to our sites in Kentucky and Tennessee, advocacy for kids affected by disasters and, of course, the incredibly successful Valentine's Day project, which is now its second year.

Diplomacy That Heals

Washington Post

Jan 22 2009

When George W. Bush was running for the presidency, he said he aspired to be an education president. He followed through in his first year by pressing Congress to pass the bipartisan No Child Left Behind Act. He found an effective partner in Margaret Spellings, who served first as the White House staff person in charge of drafting the legislation and then as secretary of education.
Happy New Year!
I went home to the United States for Christmas and New Year's. Upon returning to Sierra Leone in January, I felt re-energized and excited to get back into my work at Africare. January is a busy month for us, as many of our deadlines for filing reports and proposals come at the end of this month. One of my biggest tasks at the moment is to help Africare complete the annual report for an HIV/AIDS education program that we are undertaking together with the Global Fund. This program takes place in the Kenema and Kailahun Districts, and trains young people about how HIV is transmitted and what measures they can take to protect themselves.

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