Secretary Clinton's Africa Trip

Aug 4, 2009

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s Africa trip, August 3 to 14, features a tough and demanding agenda: she will be visiting dangerously conflicted Kenya, Congo, and Nigeria; holding a brief exchange with a Somali transition government close to succumbing to a radical Islamist movement affiliated with al Qaeda; reassuring unsteady postwar Liberia; and opening a dialogue with a newly formed government in South Africa, which confronts worsening internal economic strains and remains visibly befuddled by the continuing crisis in neighboring Zimbabwe. The secretary’s agenda bears little resemblance to President Bill Clinton’s spring 1998 Africa renaissance tour or the similarly optimistic tones of President George W. Bush’s summer 2003 and spring 2008 trips.

For full article-- CLICK HERE.

Senator Frist has a forthcoming book that will release October 5: A Heart to Serve: A Passion to Bring Health, Hope, and Healing

In Chapter one, A Mission of Mercy, Frist shares his experience of flying into Lui, Sudan, under the radar, to perform surgery in a conflict zone. This experience was a foundational one which shaped his understanding and philosophy of health diplomacy and how offering health care can be a currency for peace around the world.

For CHAPTER ONE -- CLICK HERE.

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Don't forget to order your copy of the book on Amazon.com!

 

 

Dr. Frist has an op-ed in the Houston Chronicle titled "Improve World Health Care by Increasing Prosperity." 

July 31, 2009

..."As the health care reform debate unfolds domestically, we face an opportune moment to recalculate for the better how we maximize the success of our efforts abroad to strengthen global health. By looking holistically at global health systems — the capacity, the policies, the health and non-health infrastructure — we can pursue integrated action on all the components that go into making and keeping the world's poor healthy. For their sake and ours, let us seize this moment to do so."

Read the complete op-ed here.

Next week, Senator Bill Frist will be appearing on the following shows talking about domestic health care reform.    Hope you can tune in!

Monday, July 27, 2009
9:00pm (EDT)
CNBC
Meeting of the Minds: The Future of Health Care, hosted by Maria Bartiromo
http://meetingoftheminds.cnbc.com
 
Tuesday, July 28, 2009
8:00pm (EDT)
Fox News Channel
The O'Reilly Factor
http://www.foxnews.com/oreilly/
 
Wednesday, July 29, 2009
Check Local Listings
PBS
Charlie Rose
http://www.charlierose.com/
 
Thursday, July 30, 2009
7:00am (EDT)
CNBC
Squawk Box
http://squawkbox.cnbc.com

Monday July 27 at 9 PM ET Maria Bartiromo will host a special on CNBC called "Meeting of The Minds:  The Future of Healthcare."  Senator Frist will be a guest along with several other healthcare experts.  The program is designed to crystallize what's at stake in one of the most important debates of our time. Please be sure to watch and leave a comment here after you do.  Senator Frist welcomes the input of everyone and is very interested in reading what the American people think of the debate currently underway.

Read more here.

July 17, 2009

Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

My first two weeks in the office at Africare in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania have been surprisingly busy. In fact, on my first day I was asked to accompany two co-workers on a five-day trip west to Dodoma. In Dodoma we met with representatives from the other partner organizations involved in the COPE project. We also had the opportunity to visit a household and evaluate the impact of the aspect of the COPE project designed to assist orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) households in generating income.

From Dodoma we drove three hours north to a small, rural town called Kondoa. It was pretty slow going since the roads were rough and rocky but when we got there we were escorted through the village to a specific household. Behind the house there was a small chicken coup with about six chickens and a pile of eggs. A community member explained that they would raise the chicks that would hatch from the eggs and sell them at the local market as a means of generating income.

The trip opened my eyes in more ways than one. Most of my time in Tanzania has been spent in major cities, so it was my first time visiting a village and seeing how people live in such a rural setting. Also, it was great to witness the direct impact of the program and to get an understanding for what kind of people the COPE project is serving.

Although I'm back in the office now, I enjoyed my time in the field and I'm looking forward to my next trip to Dodoma. I should be headed out there around August to administer a series of surveys designed to assess the impact COPE has had on the community it serves.

See where Krista is traveling -- Map of Tanzania: CLICK HERE

 

Project Hope

Jul 13 2009

We have made significant progress on the Munsieville Needs Assessment. After several drafts and two field tests, a final version of the survey was created. Our survey covers 11 topics that include health indicators such as housing, income, health behavior, and reproductive health. Our specific questions aim at health attitudes, general health knowledge and accessibility to health care and government services.

As we continue with the Munsieville Model, we must evaluate other settlements in the area for additional or alternative sites for Project Hope to establish programs. With the help of a local minister and director of a substance abuse center, Dave Gardner, another American, we have established contacts in Randfontein, a nearby city. We were introduced to Lucky, an eccentric Obama fanatic that is also the political representative of all of the informal settlements in one of the wards of the West Rand district.
July 10, 2009
Op-Ed Guest Columnist

Rebranding Africa

 

 

DATELINE: Imminent. About now, actually.

Soon, Air Force One will touch down in Accra, Ghana; Africans will be welcoming the first African-American president. Press coverage on the continent is placing equal weight on both sides of the hyphen.

And we thought it was big when President Kennedy visited Ireland in 1963. (It was big, though I was small. Where I come from, J.F.K. is remembered as a local boy made very, very good.)

But President Obama’s African-ness is only part (a thrilling part) of the story today. Cable news may think it’s all about him — but my guess is that he doesn’t. If he was in it for a sentimental journey he’d have gone to Kenya, chased down some of those dreams from his father.

He’s made a different choice, and he’s been quite straight about the reason. Despite Kenya’s unspeakable beauty and its recent victories against the anopheles mosquito, the country’s still-stinging corruption and political unrest confirms too many of the headlines we in the West read about Africa. Ghana confounds them.

Not defiantly or angrily, but in that cool, offhand Ghanaian way. This is a country whose music of choice is jazz; a country that long ago invented a genre called highlife that spread across Africa — and, more recently, hiplife, which is what happens when hip-hop meets reggaetón meets rhythm and blues meets Ghanaian melody, if you’re keeping track (and you really should be). On a visit there, I met the minister for tourism and pitched the idea of marketing the country as the “birthplace of cool.” (Just think, the music of Miles, the conversation of Kofi.) He demurred ... too cool, I guess.

Quietly, modestly — but also heroically — Ghana’s going about the business of rebranding a continent. New face of America, meet the new face of Africa.

For the remainder of the article: CLICK HERE.

Take a moment today to read Nicholas Kristof’s thoughtful op-ed “Would You Let This Girl Drown?” Kristof zeroes in on several very important facts. He asks a poignant, hypothetical question: “If G-8 leaders would be willing to save one drowning child, why are they collectively so far behind in meeting humanitarian aid pledges to save other children?”

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