In President Trump’s proposed budget, there’s a $54 billion bump in military spending. U.S. foreign aid would be cut by 28 percent. Global health spending beyond AIDS, malaria and vaccines will suffer.

This type of foreign aid, according to many U.S. policymakers and military leaders, increases soft power, or the global influence the United States has because it supports basic human rights and humanitarian causes. Emma-Louise Anderson and I show this payoff for the United States among people living with HIV in Zambia and Malawi.

Read the rest of the article on The Washington Post

Today, more than 783 million people around the world lack access to clean water, and nearly 2.5 billion people do not have access to proper sanitation. Because dirty water contributes to diarrheal diseases, a leading cause of death among children under the age of five, this translates to more than 700,000 preventable, treatable deaths among children every year. Without clean water to drink, cook and clean, disease and death abound.
I understand why some Americans watch their tax dollars going overseas and wonder why we’re not spending them at home. Here’s my answer: These projects keep Americans safe. And by promoting health, security and economic opportunity, they stabilize vulnerable parts of the world.
Leading the world in providing foreign assistance, albeit less than 1 percent of our budget, is not only the compassionate, moral thing to do. It’s also the smart thing to do. We know that development is a critical component to national security.
We know the facts, the statistics, and have the stories to match. Advocacy for some is simply sharing quantitative facts and qualitative, often anecdotal stories to the world, to raise philanthropic dollars. Which is one beautiful, and charitable way to advocate for others, including individuals to whom the Bible refers as "the least of these."
In a time where the notions of greatness and goodness are bandied about the public square like so many shuttlecocks, we hear little of benevolence.
Our 2017 annual letter is addressed to our dear friend Warren Buffett, who in 2006 donated the bulk of his fortune to our foundation to fight disease and reduce inequity. A few months ago, Warren asked us to reflect on what impact his gift has had on the world.

Mobilizing Medical Missions Conference

Lakewood Church

February 18, 2017

This past week executive directors Jenny Eaton Dyer, PhD and William Moore co-hosted a breakout session at Lakewood Church in Houston on the importance of nutrition during the 1000 day window – from conception to 2 years old – of a child’s life for proper cognitive and physical development. We live in a time where 1 out of 3 people suffer from malnutrition in some form. The most devastating consequences include stunting and wasting of children who are victims of undernutrition.

But the good news is that, together, we can really bolster funding and food security worldwide with advocacy. Right now less than one percent of the U.S. budget goes to foreign assistance. And nutrition is just one percent of that one percent. A fraction of funding that should be protected and enhanced with proper nutrition education and counseling during this critical time for mothers and children.

We encourage you to call or write your Congressional representative today (house.gov or senate.gov) and let them know that you support full funding for nutrition in foreign assistance to allow children and families to flourish to their full potential in school, in jobs, and in life. We can be the generation to end poverty. This is a critical step.

Please join us.

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