Rick Warren Pays Tribute to Bush's AIDS Feat

The Christian Post

Dec 02 2008

President Bush was the center of attention and outpouring of accolades Monday as Dr. Rick Warren awarded him the first ''International Medal of PEACE'' on the 20th anniversary of World AIDS Day for his unprecedented contribution to the fight against the deadly disease.

World AIDS Day

Dec 01 2008

Today is a day to celebrate. Since the inception of PEPFAR, over 2 million people have been treated in Sub-Saharan Africa, and over ten million have received care. We are fighting the battle to stop the spread of AIDS across the globe.

RED (WIRE)

Launch World AIDS Day

Dec 01 2008

Today, World AIDS Day, MSN is celebrating the launch of (RED)WIRE, (RED)'s new digital music magazine designed to help eliminate AIDS in Africa. Some of the greatest artists on earth have contributed amazing songs to (RED)WIRE. Enjoy these world premieres throughout the day and sign up for (RED)WIRE for so much more.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Marking World AIDS Day, President Bush said Monday that his presidential initiative on the deadly disease has already met its goal of treating 2 million people in sub-Saharan Africa.

When the administration launched the President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief in 2003, the goal was to support 2 million people with lifesaving antiretroviral treatment in five years.

"I'm pleased to announce that we have exceeded that goal early," Bush said standing with first lady Laura Bush on the North Lawn of the White House decorated with a giant red ribbon to mark the occasion. "The American people through PEPFAR are supporting lifesaving treatment for more than 2 million people around the world."

 

When the program began, only 50,000 people living with HIV in all of sub-Sahara Africa were receiving antiretroviral treatment, he said. In addition, the U.S. has supported care for more than 10 million people around the world who are affected by HIV, including more than 4 million orphans and vulnerable children.

"More than 237,000 babies have been born HIV free, thanks to the support of the American people for programs to prevent mothers from passing the virus on to their children," Bush said.

Cross Cultural Solutions Fellow Blog

Bangkok, Thailand

Nov 29 2008

by Kelly Madigan 

November 29, 2008

kelly madigan 2 kelly madigan 3

Although I have been back in the states from Bangkok for six months now, there is rarely a day that goes by without a reminder of my month spent there. Especially around the holidays, I am so grateful not only for my own family, but also for the opportunities I have had to make a difference in the lives of others. While teaching the alphabet, colors, and numbers to toddlers may seem inconsequential, the impact our presence had on the kids was clear. After missing just one day at Kudee Khaa Preschool to observe at a hospital, the students were overjoyed upon my return, exemplifying the influence I had on their daily lives. It is extremely difficult to return to our fortunately privileged lives and leave a Cross Cultural Solutions site behind, knowing some children were getting their only meal of the day at the school. However, it is empowering to know that the legacy of CCS will continue on with a constant flow of volunteers, enriching the lives of people worldwide.

This week, families across America will gather to celebrate their blessings in the tradition of Thanksgiving. It has become a day of televised parades, nonstop football games, and indulgent overeating. But it wasn't always a day of gluttony and gridiron. It started with a simple and prayerful observance of our forefathers gathering to offer their profound thanks to god who had given them strength to survive in their very challenging transition to life in a new world.

Global Health Forum for Middle Tennessee

Save the Date: February 27, 2009

Nov 19 2008

Would you like to learn more about the global health projects taking place through the work of organizations in Tennessee?

Join the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health (VIGH) on February 27th, 2009 for their first annual Global Health Forum for Middle Tennessee.

Sustainable projects involve many factors that overlap and affect one another. Teamwork and a strategic approach can make the difference in success. The 2009 Tennessee Global Health Forum is an opportunity for organizations from throughout the region to come together in an effort to combine forces and share our current projects.

Join Vanderbilt in learning effective approaches toward sustainability and exploring the potential for new partnerships.

Program specifics coming soon!

Go to Vanderbilt University Middle Tennessee Global Health Forum site for more details soon.

Washington, D.C.

November 12, 2008

9:05pm

 

  • Thank you, ladies and gentlemen.
  • Thank you, Dr. Frazer and Representative Payne.
  • And Thank you, Julius and Africare for putting together such a memorable evening.

 

  • It’s an honor to be here tonight to celebrate what will be the legacy of President George W. Bush: his historic and unprecedented commitment to the people of Africa.

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  • For more than twenty years, I’ve traveled to underserved areas in the developing world, often conflict nations, with World Medical Missions – not as a senator, not as an official representing the U.S. – but as a single volunteer equipped with the tools of medicine and surgery, with a goal to touch individual lives.

  

  • My own interest in HIV began as a surgical resident in Boston, who in 1981, when AIDS was first observed in the U.S., really could not fathom that a single virus could so easily devastate one’s immune system and ability to fight infections.

 

  • I went on to become a transplant specialist where we had to become experts in immune system depression and infectious disease – and over the next 20 years in medicine I watched this single virus, spread to become what is now a pandemic of biblical proportions.

 

  • What bothered me – as the first physician elected to the Senate since 1928 – was that the U.S gave some lip service to global HIV, but in reality we as a nation remained on the sidelines, as societies around the world were hollowed out.

 

  • But this changed because of the leadership of one man.  President Bush – yes, a Repbulican, who had never been to Africa -- said that we Americans will act in a way that is bigger and better than any country had acted against a single disease in history.

 

  • He said we will lead the world – and we did.

 

  • I remember in the year 2000 going to the Cabinet room in the White House for a regular Senate leadership meeting with the President.  I had just been elected as the most junior member in leadership … so my time for comment around that big oval table would always come last. 

 

  • We had covered taxation, Afghanistan, prescription drugs, the Middle East, and domestic economic policy.  So, with a picture in my pocket of a young woman who was suffering from HIV, I mentioned what I had seen and treated on my mission trips.

 

  • The President came alive.  Sitting on the edge of his seat, he spoke with passion about what he had learned; he knew the magnitude of the problem, he knew the names of the ARVs, he described how Nivirapine could save the lives of newborns -- he made it clear that he would act.

 

  • And act he did.

 

  • President Bush hosted a very small dinner in early-January 2003 in the Red Room at the White House. He invited Karyn and me, Kofi Annan, and  four others for a very special occasion: he announced privately what he would  reveal to the nation the next week: his Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief.

 

  • In the 2003 State of the Union address, President Bush asked “Congress to commit $15 billion dollars over the next five years to turn the tide against AIDS in the most afflicted nations of Africa and the Caribbean.”

 

  • I was blown away.

 

  • After his speech that night, I was interviewed by the media, as a Senator, and I told a reporter, “Five years from now, all anyone will remember will be President Bush’s historic announcement to combat HIV/AIDS in Africa.”

 

  • And here we are, five years from that moment, celebrating this momentous commitment to Africa, including --  

--the lives of 1.6 million Africans who are now receiving treatment because of PEPFAR

-- another 2 million through our contributions to the Global Fund

--the 12.7 million pregnancies in which mother-to-infant transmission was prevented

--and the care of over 6.6 million people with HIV/AIDS.

 

  • Other Initiatives in Africa led by President Bush include the following:

1.      Malaria:  His five-year, $1.2 billion effort to combat malaria has provided 4 million insecticide-treated bed nets and 7 million drug therapies to vulnerable people

 

2.      Sudan.  In Sudan, the United States played a central role as peacemaker in ending a 20-year civil war between the Arab north and African south, which killed 2 million people.

 

3.      Genocide.  It was the Bush administration that first raised the alarm about the atrocities in Darfur.

 

4.      Trade:  The Africa Growth and Opportunity Act, approved in 2000 and reauthorized in expanded form in 2004, provides trade benefits with the United States for 40 African countries that have implemented reforms to encourage economic growth.

 

5.      MCC: Africa has received $3.5 billion in additional funds from Bush's Millennium Challenge Corporation initiative, which rewards poor countries that encourage economic growth, govern well, and provide social services for their people.

 

  • America is spreading peace through health. It is medicine as a currency for peace.  It is health diplomacy at its best.

 

  • We pay tribute tonight to President George W. Bush who has proven to be the world’s leader in the crisis of AIDS in Africa.

 

  • He launched an amazing beginning, but we still have a long way to go.

 

  • Because for every 1 person we treat, 4 more are newly infected. And only 1 in 10 with HIV actually knows that they are infected.

 

  • There is much work to be done. And that is why your support of Africare and its missions is so vital.

 

  • Please join me tonight in pledging our continued support for Africare to lead us in the fight against global disease and extreme poverty.

 

  • Thank You and God Bless.

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