Every Newborn Campaign

Articles and Videos You Don't Want to Miss

May 21 2014

This week has been the launch of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's #EveryNewborn campaign, and we've seen great coverage on social media and around the web on this important issue. Here are some of our top links for you to see, in case you missed them:

Melinda Gates's speech to the World Health Organization on May 20, 2014.

Who Has Been Caring for the Baby? by Dr. Gary Darmstadt, senior fellow for Global Development at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Saving 3 million Babies Is Easier Than You Think, from TIME's Jeffrey Kluger

 

Courtney and I had the unique experience of helping a family in Mshenguville relocate their home. Mshenguville is an informal settlement within Munsieville, and the houses there are built on a hill. The houses at the bottom of the hill are in a flood-prone area with poor sewage facilities, and the families in these homes recently got permission from the local municipality to relocate to a different street near Mshenguville and move out of the flooded area. Mshenguville is sometimes referred to as a squatter’s camp because people come to the area to settle, claim an area of land, and build houses out of any available material. Because Mshenguville is an informal settlement, there is no government assistance in providing houses and resources for the community. The government simply gave the families permission to move and would not be providing new houses for the families, so anyone who wanted to move would have to do so on his or her own.

Sarakay Johnson MshenguvilleWe had the opportunity of helping a woman named Celine and her mom with the moving process. We knew Celine’s mom from the GardenSoxx® class, and when we heard they were relocating we volunteered to help. We started by preparing the site for the new house. We smoothed out the ground, cleared away the rocks, and leveled the dirt in order to create a solid foundation before the house could be physically moved to the new site.

A few days later, Celine, her family, and a group of men started the relocation process. They first had to disassemble the house piece by piece. Then they moved all the furniture, clothing, and pieces of corrugated metal that would be used to reconstruct the house to the new site that Courtney and I helped clear. By the time we arrived in the afternoon to help rebuild the house,  a great deal of progress was already made with the men doing the majority of the physical labor. Courtney and I helped hold a few pieces of metal in place while the men nailed it together, and we watched as the last side of the house was completed. Some of the metal pieces used to construct the house had corroded and could not be used in the reconstruction. The house had to be rebuilt smaller than originally intended because of a shortage of corrugated metal pieces to rebuild the house to its original size. Celine, however, remained positive that she could one day get more materials and expand her house, and she was glad to finally be moving away from the flooded area of Mshenguville.

This week we are compiling health education information and creating pamphlets for the community that will be kept at the Children’s Embassy. We had a meeting with the women in the Health Promotion Unit and discovered that there is a great need for the community to have general health information. Our preceptor asked us to create a series of brochures that would cover health topics such as nutrition and exercise, proper hand-washing technique, HIV/AIDS information, puberty, tuberculosis, and drug and alcohol abuse. We gladly agreed and will be creating different brochures for different age groups and making sure the information is culturally sensitive to the community. We will be writing the information in English and then people at the Children’s Embassy will translate the information to the various tribal languages spoken within Munsieville.

Also, this week we will be conducting part three of our research methods class. This will be the last part of the class, and we will be teaching Excel skills. After the last class, we asked the students to come up with their own short survey and then distribute it to people so that real data could be obtained. If all goes well, they will return with their survey results and we can input the data into Excel to be analyzed. We hope that the students in the class will leave with a better understanding of how to correctly develop and distribute a survey and use Excel to analyze the results. This way they can better understand the community in which they live.

It is hard to believe that Courtney and I have just over a week left in Munsieville. Our time is quickly coming to an end, and I want to savor this last little bit of time before we have to leave this wonderful community. Our sincere “thank you” to the Hope Through Healing Hands and Niswonger Foundations for helping make this incredible experience possible for both Courtney and me. We hope we made you proud.

May Newsletter

May 15 2014

Happy Mother's Day!

Her.meneutics article: "Family Planning Through A Global Lens," by Jenny Eaton Dyer, Ph.D.

Christianity Today's Her.meneutics features articles that are at the interface of women's issues and cultural issues. We were proud to have the opportunity to publish an article this week discussing the importance of access to contraception and information about a variety of family planning methods, including fertility awareness, in the developing world. These are life-saving, life-changing tools for women and families. 

In a season when contraception is debated and discussed in our own nation, it is important to consider how contraception is a pro-life cause worldwide.

U.S. Moms Support Healthy Mothers and Children Worldwide this Mother's Day

This week, Hope Through Healing Hands launched a press release citing notable faith leaders, influentials, and parents who have taken a stand to promote awareness and advocacy for maternal, newborn, and child health. 

Amy Grant, Grammy-winning Artist, notes: “Those of us who have experienced healthy pregnancies here in the U.S. need to remember how uniquely fortunate we are. For the most part, we get to choose when and how we give birth, and we have all the health care we need before, during, and after delivery. In other parts of the world, the reality is tragically different. It is estimated that 1 in 39 pregnant women in Africa died in childbirth in 2013.”

We are excited to share all the leaders who have generously offered their endorsements to the coalition. We invite you to take a moment to read about why they are speaking up for women in the developing world.

Speaking Engagements: Why Family Planning is Critical in the Developing World

Over the course of the past month, Executive Director Jenny Dyer, Ph.D. had the opportunity to speak at the Center for Strategic and International Studies on "Ethiopia's Investments in Family Planning: Lessons for U.S. Policy" along with other experts. Dyer spoke on the interface of faith and health pertaining to healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies in the developing world and its role in awareness and education both in Ethiopia as well as the United States.

We invite you to learn more about her trip to Ethiopia as well as the event. Please see the "Family Planning and Linkages with U.S. Health and Development Goals" policy paper as well as the video showcasing the amazing work done there in family planning.

Dyer also spoke at ETSU's College of Public Health on "Saving Mother and Child: Why Planning Families is Critical in Developing Nations." She offered a lecture to students and faculty that can be viewed here.

We wish everyone a Happy Mother's Day,

Bill Frist Signature

Bill Frist, MD

Greetings from rain-soaked Munsieville! Over the last two weeks, several storms have doused the Gauteng province, but the rain is necessary to turn the landscape green again and help usher in spring. While the intensity of the thunderstorms is unlike anything I have previously experienced, I am not letting the rain put a damper on my work in Munsieville.

Last week Courtney and I led part two of our surveying and research methods class, and we taught the class how to format and administer a survey. We included lessons on the layout and visual design of the survey, how to format questions and avoid bias, and the different methods used to administer questionnaires and interviews. There were eleven people in attendance, and everyone seemed engaged in the lessons. The best part of the class was teaching about interviewing techniques and conducting mock interviews to demonstrate the process. Courtney and I exemplified both a good and bad way to interview someone and then asked the class to name some positive and negative aspects of our demonstration. Next, Courtney and I paired up everyone in the class, gave them a mock interview scenario, and had them act out a good and bad interview based on what they had just learned. Everyone demonstrated understanding of what Courtney and I were teaching. All the groups really expressed their creativity, and I was pleased that the class was so engaged in the activity.

Courtney and I also got to conduct two Garden Soxx® training classes in Mshenguville. Because Safira had some trouble contacting some of the families, the training had to be rescheduled several times. It was exciting to finally have not one, but two Garden Soxx® classes in the community. After so much interest was shown in the project at the first class, Safira, Courtney, and I decided that a second class would be beneficial so that more people could learn about the Garden Soxx® project. Because Courtney and I had already created our own Garden Soxx® sock and knew how to assemble it, we went to the first class and demonstrated how to create the sock. Once we did the demonstration, we let the ladies there work together to assemble a new sock. At the second class, Courtney and I let the ladies from the first class teach the new members who were at the second class, and the ladies created three new socks together. We felt this was a good way to encourage the women of Mshenguville to take ownership of the project because they are now the ones instructing others on sock assembly. I am excited about the future of this project, and I think that it will be sustainable in the community of Mshenguville.

I am also happy to report that some of the ladies at the Children’s Embassy are starting to use the vegetables from the keyhole garden to made salads for the community! Our preceptor said she enjoyed a tasty salad of vegetables grown from our garden and commended Courtney and me on our work with both the keyhole garden and the Garden Soxx®. It is exciting to get to see the bountiful results of a small initiative that was started at the beginning of my internship.

To conclude this post, I want to mention that one of the highlights of this reporting period was getting to spend an afternoon with Mama Gloria, the sister of Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Desmond Tutu is the patron of The Thoughtful Path and a respected social rights activist who has earned several awards and recognitions for his work. His sister lives in Munsieville, just down the street from the Children’s Embassy.  It was a pleasure to spend the afternoon with Mama Gloria and hear her talk about her daily life and the people in Munsieville. She is truly an inspiring lady, and I am fortunate to have had the chance to meet her! 

Originally published in The Tennessean, May 3, 2014

When we married in December 2007, we knew we wanted to enjoy the adventure of marriage together for a while before having children. So, we concocted a whimsical battle cry: “Baby Free Until 2013!”

In summer 2013, after thoughtful conversations, we decided to go off birth control. And lo and behold, we quickly became pregnant. The battle cry worked.

As we watch Jena’s belly grow, we realize how fortunate we were, especially as some of our closest friends and family have not had nearly as much ease. We also recognize that for many, contraceptive access and the ability to time pregnancy are not universal.

You see, we work for two organizations that provide health care to HIV-infected and affected people in Africa, and we have been given a unique window into the lives of many girls, women and men in countries like Kenya, Uganda, Zambia, Ethiopia, Rwanda and Central African Republic. For our friends in that part of the world, the nuanced discussion of family planning is very different than the one we hear in the U.S.

In Lwala, Kenya, 16-20 percent of the adult population is HIV-positive. The Lwala Community Hospital is providing more than 1,000 HIV patients with life-saving medical care. Many of these patients come to us for contraceptive options.

Try to imagine that you are our friend Maurice. You are facing some frightful questions because you are HIV-positive, but your wife, Betty, is not. A nurse explains to you that the hospital is out of condoms, so you must abstain from sex or risk infecting Betty. The nurse says the condom shortage is nationwide and there is nothing she can do.

Imagine that you are our friend Sarah. You are just 13 and a new mother to a premature baby boy named Moses. You have had to drop out of school to care for your new child. You did not plan on getting pregnant, but an older relative forced himself on you while he was drunk. Your parents know about the rape but have decided not to confront the relative and instead blame you. Your circumstance makes you one of the 300 pregnant teens who delivered their babies at Lwala Community Hospital last year.

When you bring Moses in for immunizations, you ask the nurse for birth control pills, but she tells you they are not available to you without parental permission. “How do I avoid getting pregnant again?” you ask.

For us as Americans, these seem like unimaginable predicaments related to contraception — catch-22s with life-altering consequences. But, sadly, these stories are not unique in Africa.

We are Christians, propelled by our faith in a loving and merciful God to do the work we do. Most of the year, we make our home in Tennessee. We are not abortion-rights activists or “lefty liberals.” We understand why some people of faith are hesitant to support increased access to contraceptive choices. But our view has been broadened through our experiences and the many conversations we’ve had with families in Africa.

The nuanced circumstances of couples like Maurice and Betty, or young teenagers like Sarah, cannot be addressed with one-dimensional responses. We must take seriously the complexity and urgency of the dilemma for many around the world. International policies, politics and financing must do more to account for the real predicaments people face.

We believe that families have the right to time their child-rearing; protect themselves against HIV; and pursue healthy, productive and prosperous lives. We believe that teenage girls should be able to avoid unintended pregnancies and the difficult decisions and desperate measures that sometimes follow. And we believe that access to contraception is critical to reducing poverty and promoting health.

As we welcome our newborn baby, we invite you to join us in respectfully broadening the conversation around contraception to include the perspective and urgency of our friends in Africa.

James and Jena Lee Nardella live in Nashville. James is executive director of Lwala Community Alliance, and Jena is co-founder of the nonprofit Blood:Water Mission.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Melany Ethridge (972) 267-1111 melany@alarryross.com Or: Kate Etue (615) 481-8420 (m)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Joining with Senator Bill Frist, MD’s Hope Through Healing Hands and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, several U.S. celebrity and faith-based moms joined together to support to the Faith-Based Coalition for Healthy Mothers and Children Worldwide, a campaign to improve global maternal and child health, including through education about healthy spacing and timing of pregnancies.

Hope Through Healing Hands (HTHH), a Nashville-based global health organization, recently partnered with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to create the coalition. Some of the moms and parents joining the effort include Amy Grant, Grammy-winning Christian music artist; Kimberly Williams Paisley, actress and writer; Jennifer Nettles, Grammy-winning Country music artist; Tracie and Scott Hamilton, Olympic gold-medal ice skater and philanthropist; Jena Lee and James Nardella, Leaders of Blood:Water Mission and Lwala Community Alliance; Cathy Taylor, DrPH, MSN, RN, Dean and Professor of The Gorden E. Inman College of Health Sciences and Nursing at Belmont University; and Elizabeth Styffe, RN MN PHN and Global Director of HIV&AIDS and Orphan Care Initiatives at Saddleback Church.

“Those of us who have experienced healthy pregnancies here in the U.S. need to remember how uniquely fortunate we are,” Amy Grant said. “For the most part, we get to choose when and how we give birth, and we have all the health care we need before, during, and after delivery. In other parts of the world, the reality is tragically different. It is estimated that 1 in 39 pregnant women in Africa died in childbirth in 2013.”

“We believe children are a gift from the Lord, and every child deserves the opportunity to live a healthy life. If we can equip a mother with the knowledge of how better to time and space her children, she will be more likely to survive pregnancy and birth complications and the child will more likely survive the newborn stage,” says Elizabeth Styffe. “God wants us to live life in abundance, and we can take the first steps toward making this a reality for so many around the world.”

“Girls are often forced into marriage and pregnancy as young as age 12, and pregnancy and delivery are extremely hard on their bodies,” Jena Nardella explains.  “Too many die from complications, and those who survive often never recover 100 percent.  Yet many face continued pregnancies year after year, without being able to adequately care for their children. These adolescent girls are at much greater risk of HIV exposure which can affect their newborns, as well. As for the children, when pregnancies are not timed and spaced in a healthy way, many children don’t survive the newborn stage.”

“The cycle is devastating not only to families, but to entire countries and societies,” Senator Frist, M.D. noted, reflecting on his many trips overseas to provide medical care. “Women caught in this cycle often lose their opportunity to complete their education, which in turn limits their ability to do what they want most—to give their children an opportunity at a better life.”

“I believe this one issue – the healthy spacing and timing of pregnancies – could be a key to saving lives and economic empowerment in the developing world,” said HTHH Executive Director Jenny Dyer, Ph.D. “The good news is that we have the information and tools that can make this a reality. If a young woman in Africa can delay her first pregnancy until age 18 or later, she is dramatically more likely to stay in secondary school, and perhaps even attend college, providing stable financial support for her family to have a brighter future. Then, if she can space her pregnancies just three years apart, her children are twice as likely to survive infancy.”

Dyer continued. “There is great room for hope, and we are so delighted to have U.S. moms join us in this effort.  They can uniquely empathize with women around the world who struggle with their pregnancies, who face risk of complications during childbirth, and who suffer deeply at the illness or loss of a child. By raising their voices here at home, these leaders are bringing about transformation for women far away.”

While celebrating motherhood here in the U.S., faith communities around the country are giving their time and energy to ensure motherhood is a joy for women globally, rather than the high-risk event it is for far too many.

Information about those who have joined the coalition to date, as well as how others can help is available at http://www.hopethroughhealinghands.com/faith-based-coalition. Endorsements for the coalition are available at http://www.hopethroughhealinghands.com/endorsements_1.

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Hope Through Healing Hands is a Nashville-based nonprofit 501(c)(3) whose mission is to promote improved quality of life for citizens and communities around the world using health as a currency for peace. Senator Bill Frist, M.D., is the founder and chair of the organization, and Jenny Eaton Dyer, Ph.D., is the CEO/Executive Director.

 

 

 

 

 

Class, Camp, and Compost.  What do these three things have in common?  They all relate to the work Courtney and I completed last week.  We have been working hard on three different projects, and I am very excited about what we were able to accomplish.  

Our first big project of the week was to teach part one of a surveying and research methods class.  In September, Paul Brooks, the director of Project Hope, visited Munsieville with some Project Hope board members in order to check up on The Thoughtful Path’s operations.  He discussed the importance of community mapping and surveying in order to better understand the Munsieville community.  He stressed the need to get quantifiable survey results so that statistics could be interpreted and the needs of the people addressed. After hearing this Courtney and I talked to our preceptor and suggested putting together a three-part research methods class that would help teach volunteers and workers from The Thoughtful Path how to design their own surveys and interpret the results. In this way they would be better equipped to assess the needs of the community.  We presented the first class on Tuesday of last week.  There were nine people in attendance, including our preceptor, and I am happy to report that it was a great success!

In this first class Courtney and I discussed how to design a survey and covered the different types of surveys, types of survey questions, and emphasized clarity, simplicity, and neutrality in wording of questions.  We also had everyone participate in a group activity in which they had to choose a survey topic, design survey questions that would address that topic, and then explain how they would conduct a survey on that topic.  One lady in the class was so inspiring as she got up to present her group’s work.  She demonstrated understanding of all the topics that Courtney and I had covered in the class and gave an excellent presentation! It was encouraging to see that the first class went well.  Courtney and I have already scheduled the next class for the middle of October and we will be teaching ways to format a survey.

The next big event was participating in a youth camp where Courtney and I taught lessons on exercising and nutrition.  This was an unexpected project, but it turned out to be a pleasant surprise and a lot of fun.  The youth camp was a weeklong event for youth in Munsieville that range in age from approximately 15 to 18 years.  There were 18 participants at the camp and they were learning different life lessons so that they could then teach these lessons to other younger kids in the Munsieville community.  This really is an amazing group of youth and it was so fun to get to spend time with them.  Surprisingly, most of them do not receive any formal health classes in their schools, so they were really listening to the exercise and nutrition lessons that Courtney and I were teaching.

For the exercise class, Courtney and I spoke about the importance of exercise on a daily basis and what happens to the body when it does not get enough regular physical activity. We demonstrated some basic exercises that the youth could do at home without any formal workout equipment.  After doing the various exercises with them, we played a game called The Last Man Standing where Courtney and I called out the different exercises we just taught, and the youth had to continually do them until there was just one person left doing the exercises—the last man (or woman) standing.  This was a lot of fun and it was interesting to see how competitive everyone got with each other.

On Thursday of last week, Courtney and I taught the nutrition class.  This was highly relevant, as most of the youth had never heard about the food pyramid, portion sizes, or the importance of a balanced diet.  Everyone seemed very engaged in the lesson and quite a few questions were asked about diabetes and low-sugar and low-sodium diets.

The final project of last week involved creating our own Garden Soxx® so that Courtney and I could better understand how to create the “sock” once we train the families.  Courtney and I cut the black mesh material, filled it with compost, and tied off the ends of the material to create the “sock.”  We then planted nine starter vegetable plants inside the sock.  This involved cutting holes in the sock and digging away a small hole with our fingers in order for the starter to have a place to grow.  Now that we better understand how to create a proper Garden Soxx® garden, Courtney and I can teach the families how to grow these gardens in their homes in Mshenguville.  The small keyhole garden that Courtney and I planted at the Children’s Embassy at the beginning of our time here is thriving.  It is exciting to see a garden full of leafy green vegetables that once started out as small starter plants.  All the mamas at the Embassy are excited about getting to eat these vegetables in a few more weeks.  I believe that the Garden Soxx® project will be just as successful, if not more so, as people learn to grow their own gardens for themselves.

I remain positive that the actual process of teaching the families and talking to them about the gardening initiative will happen soon.  The training process was supposed to happen last week, but it is now rescheduled for this coming week.  Mama Safira, who walked through Mshenguville with Courtney and me to help us find the houses a couple weeks ago, has had trouble contacting the five families and getting them together to meet.  This actually made me aware of how often I take for granted the ease of communication that is available in the US.  Not everyone in the township has a cell phone, and it is not like Mama Safira can simply e-mail a Google calendar or send an event reminder on Facebook.  She has to go door-to-door and speak with everyone and make the families aware of what we are planning.  Hopefully we can get all the families together soon so that they can start growing their own gardens.

Last week was a busy week of work, but it is exciting to know that Courtney and I are getting things accomplished and making a difference in the Munsieville community.  I look forward to my next report and giving details of further work. 

CSIS Ethiopia blog

In January, we traveled as part of a CSIS delegation to Ethiopia to see the work happening there in their Health Extension Workers program. Because of their leadership focus on advancing maternal health and the healthy timing and specing of pregnancy, contraception use has risen from 15% in 2005 to 29% in 2011. This is a tremendous gain, although there is still a long way to go before every women who wants access to contraception has it.

Watch this video to learn more about the program.

This starts week number four of my internship here in Munsieville, and I cannot believe time is going by this fast!  Last week Courtney and I began work on a big project that I hope will have a lasting positive impact on the people of Munsieville.

As I mentioned in my last post, Courtney and I planted a small vegetable garden.  This served as a pilot to see how the vegetables that were planted would thrive in the climate and sun exposure.  Now that we understand what types of vegetables are appropriate to grow at this time of year and in this climate, we can take our project to the next level with the help of a product called Garden Soxx®.  We are encouraging the women of the community to grow their own vegetable gardens using this product.  Garden Soxx® was developed by a company called Filtrexx International and consists of a black mesh material filled with weed-free compost.  The mesh material can be cut to any desired size, and it creates perfect growing conditions for a garden without requiring a large piece of land or nutrient rich soil.  The compost-filled mesh can be placed anywhere and, with appropriate watering and care, will grow a small garden.  What Courtney and I would ultimately like to see is a community full of these homegrown gardens, with one at every home in Munsieville.

Sarakay Johnson Muncieville

We are piloting this project with five houses in Mshenguville that we think would most benefit from this initiative.  Mshenguville is an informal settlement within Munsieville, and the houses there were selected based on household income and the number of children livingin each home.  On Tuesday and Wednesday of last week, Courtney and I walked through Mshenguville with Safira, one of the ladies working with The Thoughtful Path, so we could find the houses and talk to the families to get them interested in the idea of growing their own gardens.  We are thinking of making the garden growing into a competition so that the families will be encouraged to take care of and look after their gardens.  Ultimately, though, this project is about sustainability and teaching the women to garden for themselves and then going out and teaching their neighbors to do the same.  We had successful home visits in Mshenguville, and this week we will begin gathering the materials for the gardens and teaching the women how to start using their Garden Soxx®. Imagine how great it would be for every family in Munsieville to be growing their own vegetables!

There were some very surreal moments when I could not believe I was actually being invited to sit in someone’s house in Mshenguville.  While it is easy to refer to the structures there as shacks, it became very real to me that they are homes.  They are places where people cook meals, spend time with their family, and find rest.  There is a noticeable sense of pride from the residents, especially women, about where they live.  One lady even apologized to us for the messiness because she had not had a chance to clean that morning.  Another lady was doing her laundry and, when she saw us approaching, was quick to go inside and grab crates for us to sit on because that was all she had and she wanted us to be comfortable.  I was very touched by how welcoming these people were.  Even though they don’t have much, they offer what they do have in order for guests to feel more comfortable . . . in their homes.

By Jenny Eaton Dyer, PhD

Having just concluded teaching my annual course at Vanderbilt, Global Health Policy and Politics, I am inspired to write a blog series based on a session I teach regarding the “psychology of global health.” In that session, I have students read a chapter from Peter Singer’s The Life You Can Save. In this chapter, he outlines six reasons  for “Why We Don’t Give More” in terms of philanthropy.

In this blog series, I will write on both why you may OR may not care about global health, along these lines of Singer’s arguments, and I will offer reasons for both. I think this helps explicate our thinking and behavior when it comes to helping people in our global village. It may explain why you are drawn to a specific nonprofit to donate or why you could care less about advocacy, for example.

The first reason it is difficult for us, as humans, to care about global health issues is that it is overwhelming! We are MUCH more apt to give or participate if we focus on ONE single person. Studies show that if we can focus on ONE name, ONE face, and ONE story – we will donate or act far more than if we had the opportunity do the same amount of good for 1000 people. Or even just two. This is called focusing on the “identifiable victim.” We have the capacity to hone in on the one, but not the many. Not even more than one. 

Because a group of people can easily succumb to anonymity in our minds, we lose the emotional stamina and persistence it takes to altruistically donate or take action to save lives. “The many” overwhelms our emotional response system.

We need an image of just ONE person to sustain our interest long enough to feel a human connection, perhaps a transference, with their personal story. This is why child sponsorships are so successful, for instance.

Perhaps put more clearly, we have two systems of thinking. Our first system is emotional, intuitive, and reactive. This system allows us to give generously during an earthquake as we mourn the victims or come to aid quickly during a flood. This system responds immediately with an outpouring of altruism.

Our second system is analytical, logical, and deliberative. As we consider more deeply our actions, we tend to act less quickly and allow for strategy and pragmatism to prevail. 

Most non-profit organizations will attempt to elicit your emotional—system one--response  to a crisis. They want you to move quickly without much analysis.

When it comes to advocating for maternal and child health and the healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies, we instead are asking you to deliberate. To think along the lines of action at a global scale. We would like to ask you to engage system two for a thoughtful, long term stragey of prevention.

220 million women around the world don’t have access to family planning but want to avoid pregnancy, and 287,000 women lost their lives in childbirth last year. Moreover, 6.9 million children will die from preventable, treatable disease this year.

We challenge you to think strategically about these problems for a moment and to partner with us as we draw on years of research, on-the-ground experience, and cultural expertise.

Over the next several weeks we’ll discuss why you may or may not care about global health. We will review Singer’s work highlighting how futility, parochialism, the diffusion of responsibility, fairness, and money affect the good we could do for global health.

We will look at the flip side of that as well. We will discuss why global health is of utmost importance in terms of national security, foreign policy, economics/investments, public health, and humanitarian reasons.

In this age of increasing globalization—we are the generation that can feasibly achieve global health goals for millions. Far beyond our expectations.

We hope you will join us.

 

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