Dr.Frist published an op-ed in the Boston Globe titled "Global Healthcare Takes More Than A Pill."  In the op-ed, Dr. Frist talks about the work of the Millenium Challenge Corporation. He writes "The US government’s Millennium Challenge Corporation takes an innovative approach to strengthening the policy environment for global health. From the outset, the corporation evaluates a country’s immunization rates, total public expenditure on health, and commitment to combating corruption to determine where to invest its development grants. This smart approach ensures that US dollars are spent wisely in countries already taking steps to do their part to strengthen the health of their citizens."

Read the complete op-ed here.

From Tanzania: Update from Krista Ford

August 10, 2009

           I haven't had the chance to go on anymore exciting field visits yet, but I have become more familiar with how NGOs work. My supervisor has been out of the country for the last two weeks and consequently I've been given a lot more responsibility. For example, I lead this month's meeting of the Quality Improvement Task Force. The Q.I. Task Force meets monthly to discuss issues pertaining to the quality and guidelines of the care and support of orphans and other vulnerable children (OVC) in Tanzania. My supervisor is a co-chair on the task force and she usually hosts the meeting but I led the meeting in her absence.  The task force is in the process of developing national guidelines for quality improvement of OVC care as well as a household status tool to be used in assessing the household conditions of OVC. The discussion about the process of creating and revising the documents gave me insight into how national guidelines for development work are established and the relationship between governmental ministries and non-governmental organizations.

            I was also invited to the Implementing Partners Group meeting in my supervisor's absence. This monthly meeting is a chance for NGOs and CBOs operating in Tanzania to come together and share best practices and lessons learned. At the meeting we discussed everything from a recent trip to Egypt to share promising practices to progress made on incorporating children with disabilities into mainstream education. I had assumed, since most NGOs target specific issues and populations, that they work independently but the IPG meeting revealed the interconnectedness of Tanzania's NGO community. So many of the NGOs/CBOs rely on each other as partners in implementation that they seem more like a network than a group of independent organizations.

            My next field visit is currently scheduled for September. I will be heading to Iringa (one of Tanzania's colder regions) to visit beneficiaries and implementing partners. My co-workers have been warning me that I will need to purchase a heavy jacket! I'm enjoying getting to know my co-workers here in the office and partners at other organizations but I am looking forward to traveling to other parts of Tanzania and witnessing the impact of OVC programming in the field.

Senator Frist's first trip in Medical Missions was with Dr. Dick Furman and World Medical Missions, an affililate of Samaritan's Purse.

Samaritan's Purse has been doing good work in Sudan for some time. I thought it appropriate to highlight their work, in support of their continued efforts, here as we focus on Sudan this month.

Sudan: Samaritan's Purse

During decades of vicious civil war, more than 2 million people lost their lives and thousands of communities were destroyed. Samaritan's Purse has been helping the people of Sudan since 1997, by providing food, shelter, clean water, agriculture assistance, education, medical aid, and vocational training programs. In Darfur, we have fed 220,000 people who were forced from their homes by government-backed militias. In 2005, we launched a major church reconstruction project for Christians in South Sudan who suffered violent persecution.

For more CLICK HERE.

Franklin Graham called for a Day of Prayer for Sudan, August 1. He has requested prayers for the following:

• Omar Hassan Ahmad al-Bashir, President of Sudan

• Salva Kiir Mayardit, President of Southern Sudan

• A peaceful election in January

• The vote on independence for Southern Sudan in 2011

• Revival and prayer in local churches

• Lasting peace throughout Sudan

We welcome your comments.

Secretary Clinton's Africa Trip

Aug 4, 2009

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s Africa trip, August 3 to 14, features a tough and demanding agenda: she will be visiting dangerously conflicted Kenya, Congo, and Nigeria; holding a brief exchange with a Somali transition government close to succumbing to a radical Islamist movement affiliated with al Qaeda; reassuring unsteady postwar Liberia; and opening a dialogue with a newly formed government in South Africa, which confronts worsening internal economic strains and remains visibly befuddled by the continuing crisis in neighboring Zimbabwe. The secretary’s agenda bears little resemblance to President Bill Clinton’s spring 1998 Africa renaissance tour or the similarly optimistic tones of President George W. Bush’s summer 2003 and spring 2008 trips.

For full article-- CLICK HERE.

Senator Frist has a forthcoming book that will release October 5: A Heart to Serve: A Passion to Bring Health, Hope, and Healing

In Chapter one, A Mission of Mercy, Frist shares his experience of flying into Lui, Sudan, under the radar, to perform surgery in a conflict zone. This experience was a foundational one which shaped his understanding and philosophy of health diplomacy and how offering health care can be a currency for peace around the world.

For CHAPTER ONE -- CLICK HERE.

***

Don't forget to order your copy of the book on Amazon.com!

 

 

Dr. Frist has an op-ed in the Houston Chronicle titled "Improve World Health Care by Increasing Prosperity." 

July 31, 2009

..."As the health care reform debate unfolds domestically, we face an opportune moment to recalculate for the better how we maximize the success of our efforts abroad to strengthen global health. By looking holistically at global health systems — the capacity, the policies, the health and non-health infrastructure — we can pursue integrated action on all the components that go into making and keeping the world's poor healthy. For their sake and ours, let us seize this moment to do so."

Read the complete op-ed here.

Next week, Senator Bill Frist will be appearing on the following shows talking about domestic health care reform.    Hope you can tune in!

Monday, July 27, 2009
9:00pm (EDT)
CNBC
Meeting of the Minds: The Future of Health Care, hosted by Maria Bartiromo
http://meetingoftheminds.cnbc.com
 
Tuesday, July 28, 2009
8:00pm (EDT)
Fox News Channel
The O'Reilly Factor
http://www.foxnews.com/oreilly/
 
Wednesday, July 29, 2009
Check Local Listings
PBS
Charlie Rose
http://www.charlierose.com/
 
Thursday, July 30, 2009
7:00am (EDT)
CNBC
Squawk Box
http://squawkbox.cnbc.com

Monday July 27 at 9 PM ET Maria Bartiromo will host a special on CNBC called "Meeting of The Minds:  The Future of Healthcare."  Senator Frist will be a guest along with several other healthcare experts.  The program is designed to crystallize what's at stake in one of the most important debates of our time. Please be sure to watch and leave a comment here after you do.  Senator Frist welcomes the input of everyone and is very interested in reading what the American people think of the debate currently underway.

Read more here.

July 17, 2009

Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

My first two weeks in the office at Africare in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania have been surprisingly busy. In fact, on my first day I was asked to accompany two co-workers on a five-day trip west to Dodoma. In Dodoma we met with representatives from the other partner organizations involved in the COPE project. We also had the opportunity to visit a household and evaluate the impact of the aspect of the COPE project designed to assist orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) households in generating income.

From Dodoma we drove three hours north to a small, rural town called Kondoa. It was pretty slow going since the roads were rough and rocky but when we got there we were escorted through the village to a specific household. Behind the house there was a small chicken coup with about six chickens and a pile of eggs. A community member explained that they would raise the chicks that would hatch from the eggs and sell them at the local market as a means of generating income.

The trip opened my eyes in more ways than one. Most of my time in Tanzania has been spent in major cities, so it was my first time visiting a village and seeing how people live in such a rural setting. Also, it was great to witness the direct impact of the program and to get an understanding for what kind of people the COPE project is serving.

Although I'm back in the office now, I enjoyed my time in the field and I'm looking forward to my next trip to Dodoma. I should be headed out there around August to administer a series of surveys designed to assess the impact COPE has had on the community it serves.

See where Krista is traveling -- Map of Tanzania: CLICK HERE

 

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