Brad Paisley's H20 World Tour Gets Senatorial Support

by Donna Hughes

The Boot

May 26, 2010

Brad Paisley's new H20 World Tour not only points out the fun aspects of water, but it also draws attention to the serious side of it as well. Brad partnered with the organization Hope Through Healing Hands to help raise funds and to bring awareness to the fact that millions of people around the world do not have access to safe drinking water.

How he came across the safe water initiative was nearly by accident. "I've become friends with [Senator] Bill Frist, and Bill and I went to Washington, D.C., to the Alfalfa Dinner," Brad explains to The Boot. "He took me as a guest to see and meet all these guys. It was the most insane room I've ever been in. Colin Powell comes up and says hello, and then he's talking to [California Sen.] Dianne Feinstein, and then there's [Mississippi Governor] Haley Barbour 'Hey Haley Barbour. How've you been?' I played an event for him. Then you've got [Vice President] Joe Biden."

"And everybody you see is walking around in this place," Brad continues. "On the airplane, [Sen. Frist] was asking about things that were going on, and I told him about that we were going to have the H20 tour and if he knew of any charities. And he said, 'Absolutely. Through the one I'm involved with.' He said it's the biggest problem in the world. It gets overshadowed by disease. It gets overshadowed by natural disasters and everything else -- the largest killer of both children, and I think people in general, is unclean water. I think one billion people are without it, or something like that. And his theory is this, 'If we can go in these places by digging a well or whatever, this is the biggest thing we could do for the world as the wealthiest nation.' So, we decided to pair that up and make that a part of the [tour] too, so we're not overlooking the fact that water is also very important as well as fun."

Senator Frist, his family and staff were on hand in Virginia Beach for the kickoff of the H20 tour. "It was so exciting to be there for the very first show," says the Tennessee senator, who helped to found Hope Through Healing Hands. "We have a great booth, and we signed up many interested activists and donors for this important campaign for clean water."

The show's headliner stopped by the booth to say hello and picked up one of the Water=Hope campaign t-shirts to help spread the word of the organization even further.

The next stop on Brad's H20 trek is in Kansas City, Mo., on Friday, May 28.

 

by Christian L. Gilbert, M.D. F.A.C.S.
Associate Medical Director
International Children's Heart Foundation

Olken Foncime May 2010

Olken Foncime, 2010

My wife and I were invited to attend a gathering sponsored by Hope through Healing Hands at Senator William Frist's home in Nashville. Towards the end of the evening I was approached about a child in Haiti, Olken Foncime, who was very sick with a heart defect. This was the end of September 2009 and in early October I was planning to leave for Dominican Republic for a two week mission and I offered I would be glad to help this child, however he would need to come to Santiago to be evaluated.

After a few emails and several back and forth conversations with Dr. Dorian, who by the way is the man of God who first identified this child, it was arranged for the boy to come to Santiago.

When he arrived we learned he had Tetralogy of Fallot and was profoundly cyanotic(blue) and would need some blood exchanges and a shunt procedure. All that went according to plan and he was released from the hospital in several days, much improved, see pictures below. Somehow I knew he would mean so much more than one child getting surgery and going home. His gentle spirit and captivating smile were contagious and all who met him instantly fell in love with him.


When tragedy struck on January 10, 2010 everyone was fearful he might have been injured or killed. Frantic email were sent out and after several anxious days we found out he was OK but the orphanage was severely damaged. Dr. Dorian traveled to Haiti after the earthquake to help with emergency relief and found him there and made arrangements for him to return to the states on a medical visa for his corrective procedure.


Out of all this an idea came forth, which I believe is from the Holy Spirit, that we needed to develop a program for Haitian children with heart defects. So here we are gathering ideas and looking for support for this project: To provide a place for 400 children over a period of five years and hopefully find a more permanent location for a cardiac institute in Haiti to care for these children closer to home.

Thankfully, we have on the island a place where children can receive advanced cardiac care in Santiago DR at Hospital Infantil Arturo Grullon. In fact, the hospital is about to break ground on a new pediatric cardiac institute specifically for children with heart disease. This will allow for the more immediate need to be met, however a more lasting solution needs to be developed. This will take more hard work and prayer and with His direction I believe we can find an answer.

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1750 Madison Ave, Suite 500
Memphis, Tennessee 38104
757-705-0492
www.babyheart.org

May 24, 2010

by Jenny Dyer, Ph.D.

Brad Paisley and Bill Frist Photo 

In spite of the flooding of millions of dollars worth of the H2O tour instruments and equipment, the show still went on.

The Brad Paisley H2O World Tour began in Virginia Beach this Friday night, and critical reviews are saying it will spoil you for any other summer shows...and maybe even Disney World.

Hope Through Healing Hands has been honored to partner with the tour to promote awareness, advocacy, and philanthropy for clean, safe water initiatives around the world with our Water=Hope Campaign.

Senator Frist and his family, staff, and friends flew to Virginia Beach for the launch of the tour.

"It was so exciting to be there for the very first show. I'm proud to be partnered with the H2O tour and I'm proud of the hard work of all our Water=Hope Campaign volunteers. We have a great booth, and we signed up many interested activists and donors for this important campaign for clean water," says Frist.

Being in Virginia Beach, the volunteers talked with lots of fans that were current or retired members of the military, many of whom had seen the need for clean water around the world first hand and were eager to lend their support. 

We also got a lot of love from the Paisley crew - Brad himself came by and picked up a shirt from our booth, so keep an eye out for it to appear on stage sometime soon. The tour continues on, and we are looking forward to getting more and more people involved!

If you'd like to be a volunteer, sign up at www.waterequalshope.com/volunteer. We may be coming to a city near you soon!

University Teaching Hospital

Lusaka, Zambia

Zambia

The two weeks I spent on the gynecology service were eye-opening and much less pleasurable than working on the maternity wards. On this service we were mostly giving bad news and taking care of chronically ill patients. Of the urgent cases, the majority presented with complaints of bleeding during the first trimester of pregnancy. At least half of these were spontaneous abortions (miscarriages), an average of 12 per 24 hour shift. These patients needed manual vacuum aspiration to empty the uterus of any retained products of conception. Amazingly, the women accepted the news gracefully and were cooperative with this method of treatment. Only their strength carried them through this painful procedure as analgesia was not given.

Unfortunately, a few of the women lost a significant amount of blood and fainted soon after the procedure. We scrambled to start intravenous fluids and manually monitor vital signs for quick resuscitation. We were always very concerned about blood loss knowing that the entire hospital had a critical shortage of blood available. For weeks most requests for blood transfusions were denied. Blood was only given for surgical cases since these patients were at highest risk for becoming acutely anemic.

I had the pleasure of visiting the Chongwe District Health Center, a rural health center outside of Lusaka. The clinic was very busy and ran as efficiently as possible with 1 physician working day shift, 1 clinical officer, 2 midwives, and 4 or 5 nurses. This center functions as a hospital and clinic, keeping patients who need close monitoring overnight as well as treating any acute cases that come day or night. On site is an antiretroviral clinic used for the care of people with HIV/AIDS, a women's clinic with equipment to perform cervical cancer screening, and men's and women's wards which are usually mixed due to an overflow of patients. Pediatric cases are also treated and kept overnight if necessary. The physician on duty treats a variety of illnesses, from malaria to strokes to burns. Emergent cases or those needing specialized care are stabilized and sent to University Teaching Hospital, some 45 kilometers away. All medical care is free, including medications and laboratory tests. In 2009 this clinic serviced over 17,000 patients.

The medical care in Zambia is adequate. The major shortcoming is manpower, a result of limited resources. I was grateful to be welcomed as member of the medical team, helping patients receive quality care in a timely fashion. The dedication of the medical staff and strength of patients will forever influence my attitude and actions throughout my medical career.

One of our partners, Ellie's Run for Africa, will host its 6th annual 5K race and family fun day next weekend - Saturday, May 22, 2010 - at Percy Warner Park.  Not a runner?  No problem.  There's something in it for everyone...

Ellie's Run was started by a Nashville teen when she was just ten years old.  Responding to a "missionary Sunday" presentation at her church, Ellie knew that she had to do something to help the kids she saw in those pictures whose mothers could not feed them and who had no chance at an education. 

Today, Ellie is planning her 4th trip to Africa this summer and has raised $210,000 for educational efforts in the Kibera slum of Kenya through the race.  What's more is that she has learned to see the hope that the Africans have in education as a way out of the slums. 

In addition to the 5K race, Ellie's Run features a kid's one-mile fun run, African dancing and drumming, cultural activities and learning opportunities and carnival-like games.  Yes - it's a race.  But it's really a family event.
We hope to see you there on May 22!  Learn more or register at www.elliesrun.org.

Today we want to announce the launch of our Water=Hope Campaign in partnership with The Brad Paisley H2O World Tour 2010. The tour begins next week, May 21 in Virginia Beach, VA - and we will be there to promote awareness, advocacy, and philanthropy for clean, safe water.

Around the globe, one out of every seven people lacks access to safe drinking water. 

TEXT H2O to 25383 to give $10.*

Your investment will build wells, provide water purification systems, and address sanitation issues both in the United States and around the world. Check in to our website in the coming months to watch how your dollars are being spent.

Volunteers?

If you would like to volunteer to help with our booths at a Paisley concert, please visit http://waterequalshope.com/volunteer/ to sign up for a concert near you.  Friends and family are welcome to sign up as well.

Facebook

Let your Friends on Facebook know that you are supporting clean, safe water to save lives. See our NEW Application: http://apps.facebook.com/htth_water_hope/ and add it to your Facebook page!

Cut and paste the following to your Twitter/Facebook status to update your Friends and Family:

Clean, safe water saves lives. Text H2O to 25383 to give $10 today for the Water=Hope Campaign to build wells around the world.

Thanks for spreading the word and for your support. We hope to see you on the road at a Brad Paisley concert this summer!

*A one-time donation of $10 will be added to your mobile phone bill or deducated from your prepaid balance. Messaging & Data Rates May Apply. All charges are billed by and payable to your mobile service provider. Service is available on most carriers. Donations are collected for the benefit of Hope Through HEaling Hands by the Mobile Giving Foundation and subject to teh terms found at www.hmgf.org/t. You can unsubscribe at any time by replying STOP to short code "25383"; Reply HELP to "25383" for help.

There is exciting and timely news for students looking to make a direct impact in the world. Each year, the Clinton Global Initiative's CGI U sponsors a competitive grant program called the Outstanding Commitment Awards.  These grants are given to students who submit proposals for "Commitments to Action" that are aimed at improving communities and lives in their communities and across the globe.  The grant awards range from $1,000 - $10,000 and applications are open to all currently-enrolled students, both undergraduate and graduate. The applications should be focused on one of CGI U's five global challenge areas: Education, Environment & Climate Change, Peace & Human Rights, Poverty Alleviation, and Public Health, and are awarded to student-led groups focused on these areas.
This is a fantastic opportunity for students to take action in making a difference across the globe, and helping turn their ideas into reality. Time is running out however.  The final deadline has been extended to April 30, 2010, so there are only a coupe days left for you to submit your applications.
I encourage students in Tennessee and across the gobe to take advantage of this funding opportunity by submitting an application before the deadline.  For more information about this exciting project, please visit http://www.cgiu.org/funding/.
The CGI U Outstanding Commitment Awards were launched in 2008 to provide financial support to innovative, student-driven initiatives. To see a map of previous award winners and their winning projects, please click here.

PeytonHoge001Yesterday, I had the chance to visit John F. Kennedy Middle School in Antioch, TN to meet with some incredibly talented students who worked hard to raise $1,000 for Haiti relief efforts. The work they did to raise money for such a worthy cause was inspiring, and I left with a renewed and continued sense of optimism about the future leaders we have in Tennessee.

It all started in the Science Club at the school. Reading the news of the devastating earthquake in Haiti, the students wanted to act and do something to help those in need. Several of the students including Tristan Higginbotham, Quai Gordon and Destiny Vaughan, encouraged by their teacher Betty Martin, stood outside the cafeteria at lunch, collecting change and donations to help lend a hand to those in need in Haiti. The seventh and eighth grade Science Club students worked for weeks and weeks collecting money, and reached their goal of collecting $1,000.

After collecting such an amazing sum, the students wanted to find the best place to send the money, hoping to make the biggest difference. After looking at the Red Cross and other organizations, they saw that my global health organization, Hope Through Healing Hands was using 100% of donations for on the ground relief efforts and decided to send the money to Hope Through Healing Hands. With their donation, we will put it to good use, directly helping relief efforts in Haiti.

I am so proud of these students and their hard work. I especially enjoyed getting to meet with them yesterday and talk about topics such as healthy habits, the importance of clean water in developing areas and what in particular the students are learning in their science classes. I encouraged them to continue to work and study hard (and I may have also given a special push for them to consider becoming a doctor).

I would like to thank in particular Betty Martin, their science teacher and Science Club director, Dr. Sam Braden, the principal, and the entire faculty at John F. Kennedy Middle School. We had a great visit, and I am confident that their hard work is making an incredibly positive impact on the students in their school. Middle Tennessee has a lot to be proud of thanks to the leadership of these three girls and all of John F. Kennedy Middle School.

Housing programs lift poor in world

By William H. Frist and Jonathan T.M. Reckford?

8:11 p.m. Monday, April 12, 2010

http://www.ajc.com/opinion/housing-programs-lift-poor-457340.html

As in Haiti and Chile, disasters mobilize us to help families rebuild, rebound and recover.

Yet, in our rush to react, we can overlook the underlying tragedy: those most vulnerable to disaster often live in peril before the earth shakes or the sea rumbles. We must respond to the needs of disaster survivors, but we must also address the constant crisis families face daily in deplorable living conditions.

For example, nearly 9 million children die each year from preventable causes. That’s about 24,500 every day.

By the time you read this article, 50 more will have died, not because of medical barriers, but because of financial ones. Cheap medical interventions can prevent many of these deaths, but medicine isn’t the only necessary measure.

With access to clean water, proper sanitation and other basic services, decent housing fosters good health.

More should be done through public, private and nonprofit partnerships to provide proper housing.

Take those preventable causes above and consider how many of them might have been avoided had families lived in decent homes.

Pneumonia, for example, kills more children each year than AIDS, malaria and measles combined — nearly four children each minute.

Many of those deaths take place in homes with crowded living conditions where bacteria thrive.

Because too many poor families cannot afford adequate shelter, they cram too many people into too small a space — subjecting the entire household to increased risk.

Diarrhea is another leading cause of child deaths. Once a child contracts diarrhea, we can easily treat it with oral rehydration.

But consider again how that same child might have avoided the condition with access to clean water. More than 1.2 billion people lack that access.

Studies have linked health outcomes to housing and housing-related basics such as water and sanitation. In Mexico, the World Bank found that replacing dirt floors with concrete floors improved the health of children, including a 78 percent reduction in parasitic infections and a 49 percent reduction in diarrhea.

In Malawi, researchers from Emory University concluded that young children living in Habitat for Humanity homes were 44 percent less likely to contract respiratory problems, gastrointestinal diseases or malaria than their counterparts living in substandard housing.

Behind those statistics are the hopes, lives and dreams of children who are significantly less likely to fall ill when they have adequate shelter.

Health threats from inadequate housing are not limited to developing countries. In the United States, 6 million families face disproportionate health risks because of their housing. Cockroaches and mold exacerbate asthma in children and adults.

The list goes on, and even though it’s poor and low-income families who suffer most, all of us have a stake in the good health — and by extension, the good housing — of everyone.

Creating decent, affordable housing is not only the right thing to do, it’s smart and economical — saving health care dollars at home and promoting economic development internationally.

When families are well, they don’t incur costly hospital visits, and when they can afford their housing, they can better maintain a healthy life.

Health initiatives in the U.S. and beyond must address the positive impact adequate housing has on good health.

As Congress assesses U.S. foreign assistance, policy-makers should recognize the importance of shelter as a standalone issue, as well as a means to support other development outcomes, such as improved health.

We as individuals must speak up in the conversation around decent shelter.

We can advocate for sound housing policy, roll up our sleeves to build affordable housing or financially invest in housing solutions that bring health, hope and healing to families around the globe.

Dr. William H. Frist is a physician and former U.S. Senate majority leader.

Jonathan T.M. Reckford is CEO at Habitat for Humanity International.

University Teaching Hospital

Lusaka, Zambia

by Analeta Peterson, Meharry Medical College

April 12, 2010

Experiences on the Maternity Ward

I was initially blown away at the number of delivery rooms when first arriving on the labor and delivery ward at University Teaching Hospital (UTH). There were no less than 20 beds for mothers who were in labor or those who were pregnant and very ill. The monitors, such as those used to assess fetal heart rates found in most U.S. hospitals, were absent. As were bedside sitting areas for patient's family and friends, likely as a result of limited space.

Five to seven midwives provide ongoing care to each patient. Their responsibilities include monitoring the progress of labor, delivering the neonate, and immediate resuscitation of any newborn in distress. Resident physicians decide who is admitted to the ward and also monitor the progress of each patient. I mostly assist with the admission process. Many of the patients are referred from clinics within the community that are unable to adequately care for severe cases. A small number come directly from home with symptoms of labor; occasionally they have given birth at home with a family member or friend providing assistance.

There is a constant flow of patients to be assessed and cared for, at times leaving staff overburdened. In a 24 hour period 60 deliveries were completed and others were either sent home with a diagnosis of false labor or admitted to a different ward for medical therapy. An average 10 operations, including cesarean sections and removal of ectopic pregnancies, are performed by the senior resident physicians in this same time period. The operating theater is continuously in use throughout the night.

A number of the women are HIV positive and receiving appropriate therapy. The primary diagnoses I've witnessed excluding normal labor include preeclampsia and cephalopelvic disproportion (the maternal pelvis is inadequate to deliver the fetus). These patients receive the standard of care and leave the hospital in good condition.

I am very impressed with the outcome of care on the maternity wards at UTH despite the lack of expensive equipment. The Zambian women are incredibly strong and very cooperative. I'm looking forward to my next few weeks here where I will be spending time in gynecology and visiting a rural clinic.

 

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