Today, Charlie Peacock moderated a panel on How Artists Can Help Charities, especially given the current economic climate -- when money is tighter than ever. Panelists included Billy Cerveny, Brite Revolution; Kenny Alphin, Love Everybody; Jenny Dyer, Hope Through Healing Hands; Andrea Howat, Hanson’s Walk/Tom’s Shoes; Derek Webb, Blood:Water Mission; and Barrett Ward, Mocha Club.
Global Health Leader Amelia Wood arrived a couple weeks back at Kijabe with her husband Jim and baby Josiah. She is serving as a neontologist there, bolstering health care delivery and training.

We have now been in Kijabe a full week. We arrived to homemade zucchini bread and an invitation to watch "So you think you can dance" from the wonderful Davis family (our neighbors just below in the Sitaplex guest house). Not having a TV at home, we were way less in the know than some of the long term missionaries here. Kijabe is like summer camp for doctors. And although there may be some sacrifices in being in Africa (like broccoli free of aphids) our overwhelming sentiment is, "man, don't we feel at home!"
September 30, 2009

by Jenny Eaton Dyer, Ph.D.

Last night we had a really fantastic Global Health Gathering at the Frist home. Welcoming all Nonprofits who were dedicated to Global Health issues (or Millennium Development Goals) in Tennessee, we had an array of groups who attended who had traveled from as far away as Johnson City or Memphis.

These great groups, all who have joined the Tennessee Global Health Coalition, provide aid and service around the world. They provide beds, shoes, education and clean water for the world's poorest. Some offer leadership training, mental health services and a haven for child soldiers. We have groups who fight trafficking in all forms, and we have groups who train community health workers to provide better health care in forgotten corners of the world.
September 23, 2009

P&G Dinner: The Procter & Gamble Company (NYSE:PG) honored partnerships that have helped the company achieve three life-saving commitments at their "Live, Learn and Thrive" Awards event. Held at a VIP reception in conjunction with the 2009 Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) in New York City, the Awards recognize partners CARE, PSI, UNICEF and World Vision for their help in improving the lives of more than 40 million children, by providing vaccines and safe drinking water to help those in need.

Senator Bill Frist was one of four who presented awards to the partners. While there, we took several photos featured below.
September 24, 2009

Senator Frist was the Commitments Presenter in an Infrastructure Breakout Sessions Seminar: Infrastructure of Recover: Good Jobs and Smart Growth.

Global recession has slowed private sector investment and caused rampant job loss. In response, governments around the world are investing in economic recovery though forward-looking public works projects. This new generation of infrastructure investments -- from broadband networks to transit systems to clean energy technology -- is laying the ground word for global deployment of advanced technology and private sector innovation. The response to to the economic crisis has set the stage for a new generation of smarter infrastructure empowered by better use of information and more efficient use of resources. Outdated development patterns are being "leap-frogged." This session provides an opportunity to reflect on progress one year into the economic crisis and to examine the relationship between the public and private sectors.
September 22, 2009

This afternoon, the 5th annual Clinton Global Initiative commenced with the Opening Plenary led by President Obama. It is such an exciting event for global issues with the world's elites--governmental, nonprofit leaders, private sector leaders, and celebrities to name a few--who are committed to health, infrastructure, women and girls, development, and the environment.
September 23, 2009

This morning I participated in an Action Network Workshop that focused on Health Systems. This past month, I wrote an Op-Ed for the Boston Globe, "Global Healthcare Needs More Than a Pill." In that, I argued that we need to consider a "systems-approach," looking at health systems as a whole - beyond just preventing and treating infectious disease. This would include considering the renovations of health clinics, providing good roads for transportation to those clinics, access to clean water, treating chronic disease, addressing child survival, and partnerships across governments, NGO's, and the private sector to make this work. Given this framework, a discussion followed about how to move forward horizontally and vertically with infectious disease, chronic disease, and maternal and child health.
The end of August has brought with it an amplified reminder of the cultural divide between America and Tanzania. The sighting of the first crescent of the new moon signified the beginning of Ramadan and because Tanzania has a sizable Muslim population the effects are quite noticeable. Ramadan is a Muslim holy month meant to cleanse the soul and express repentance for all the sins committed during the rest of the year. Muslims must, amongst other things, fast from dawn to dusk everyday for the duration of the holy month. The goal is to be pure in thought and deed, which means Muslims give up behaviors that are thought to be sinful, negative, or distracting from spiritual introspection and closeness to God. Less orthodox Muslims who usually don't are now wearing traditional Muslim clothing and in many parts of the city where there are concentrated Muslim populations you will find restaurants closed during the day and open late into the night. In Zanzibar, where something like 98% of the population is Muslim you can be fined if caught eating publicly during daylight. The most orthodox Muslims are so strict about fasting that they spit on the ground all day to avoid consuming their own saliva.
t's not all that easy to get to Xi'an, in the heart of China, when you are in Beijing or Shanghai, but since we have a day, we are off to see one of the great wonders of the world - one that man built 2,300 years ago but just discovered during my adult lifetime.

Situated geographically in north central China, Xi'an is ranked among the great historic centers of the world. From its early role in Chinese civilization as the center for the first empire from which "Qin" (I pronounce "chin") gave the West the concept of "China," this gateway to the fabled Silk Road also was the largest and most cosmopolitan city on earth during the golden ages of the Han and the Tang.
Met this morning with the Minister of Health. The last time I was at the ministry we met just down the hall from the minister's office. That was in 2003, and SARS had struck just the month before. Allegedly the Chinese government has hidden the problem from its people and the world, but as the outbreak grew, the news exploded, and no longer could the government contain the news. I was openly critical that day in our public meeting, representing the U.S. and world opinion. Though my remarks had nothing directly to do with what was about to occur, the minister just hours later was summarily fired, a sign of recognition that China would officially change its secretive policy of minimizing the ongoing impact of SARS. And the epidemic rapidly spread throughout China, Asia, and Canada, paralyzing travel and tourism, killing hundreds, and greatly diminishing economic growth for the next year of Asia and Canada.

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