Senator Frist has a forthcoming book that will release October 5: A Heart to Serve: A Passion to Bring Health, Hope, and Healing

In Chapter one, A Mission of Mercy, Frist shares his experience of flying into Lui, Sudan, under the radar, to perform surgery in a conflict zone. This experience was a foundational one which shaped his understanding and philosophy of health diplomacy and how offering health care can be a currency for peace around the world.

For CHAPTER ONE -- CLICK HERE.

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Don't forget to order your copy of the book on Amazon.com!

 

 

July 17, 2009

Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

My first two weeks in the office at Africare in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania have been surprisingly busy. In fact, on my first day I was asked to accompany two co-workers on a five-day trip west to Dodoma. In Dodoma we met with representatives from the other partner organizations involved in the COPE project. We also had the opportunity to visit a household and evaluate the impact of the aspect of the COPE project designed to assist orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) households in generating income.

From Dodoma we drove three hours north to a small, rural town called Kondoa. It was pretty slow going since the roads were rough and rocky but when we got there we were escorted through the village to a specific household. Behind the house there was a small chicken coup with about six chickens and a pile of eggs. A community member explained that they would raise the chicks that would hatch from the eggs and sell them at the local market as a means of generating income.

The trip opened my eyes in more ways than one. Most of my time in Tanzania has been spent in major cities, so it was my first time visiting a village and seeing how people live in such a rural setting. Also, it was great to witness the direct impact of the program and to get an understanding for what kind of people the COPE project is serving.

Although I'm back in the office now, I enjoyed my time in the field and I'm looking forward to my next trip to Dodoma. I should be headed out there around August to administer a series of surveys designed to assess the impact COPE has had on the community it serves.

See where Krista is traveling -- Map of Tanzania: CLICK HERE

 

Project Hope

Jul 13 2009

We have made significant progress on the Munsieville Needs Assessment. After several drafts and two field tests, a final version of the survey was created. Our survey covers 11 topics that include health indicators such as housing, income, health behavior, and reproductive health. Our specific questions aim at health attitudes, general health knowledge and accessibility to health care and government services.

As we continue with the Munsieville Model, we must evaluate other settlements in the area for additional or alternative sites for Project Hope to establish programs. With the help of a local minister and director of a substance abuse center, Dave Gardner, another American, we have established contacts in Randfontein, a nearby city. We were introduced to Lucky, an eccentric Obama fanatic that is also the political representative of all of the informal settlements in one of the wards of the West Rand district.
Take a moment today to read Nicholas Kristof’s thoughtful op-ed “Would You Let This Girl Drown?” Kristof zeroes in on several very important facts. He asks a poignant, hypothetical question: “If G-8 leaders would be willing to save one drowning child, why are they collectively so far behind in meeting humanitarian aid pledges to save other children?”
The weather has turned here in the Johannesburg suburbs. For this reason, we work from day to day not knowing exactly what kind of participation we will have from the Munsieville residents. Mondays are spent with Engelinah, Eva, and Betty meeting with their women's groups for most of the day, and Glenn and I focusing on the specifics for our needs assessment survey. Health screening is usually every Tuesday but due to the cold weather last Tuesday (June 23) only 4 mothers attended. The weekly baby bathing held on Wednesdays have had a similar fate. The temperature was much too cold for the mothers to bath their babies even in the fellowship hall of the Catholic church for the past 3 weeks. The women did attend but we did not set up the baby tubs. They received food and clothes from other organizations as usual.
The United States is engaged in a historic debate over government's role in reforming health care. But on the continent of Africa, there is little debate that U.S. investment has reaped major rewards. Yet there, too, reforms are necessary.

By fighting measles, then AIDS and, more recently, malaria, the United States has partnered with African nations to help save millions of lives since the turn of this century. It's a remarkable achievement, and the American people have led; the American taxpayer should be proud.
So far things are going well in South Africa. My accommodations are nice and I am starting to become acclimated to the J'oburg suburb lifestyle. My work started here last Monday with a debriefing session with Stefan. We work out of a container that is on the property of a Catholic church. Each day there is a different task scheduled. On Tuesdays, we go to a little Protestant church in the informal settlement to meet with several of the women who are participants in a small savings and loan program called Village Savings Fund (VSF). Mostly all of the women have young children.

Engelina and Eva, two local women, lead these meetings and act as interpreters for Glenn and me. With such an attentive audience, it is the perfect venue to do health education. A retired health advisor, Mama Tandi, then discusses the current women's health topic. Last week, it was breast and cervical cancer. After the health talk, we begin the health screening. With the help of Engelina, Eva, and Mama Tandi, Glenn and I record height, weight, BP, and whether the children take breast milk, formula, or solid foods. We will continue to collect the data mostly to asses the health risks of obesity and hypertension.
Things are going well down here in the Southern Hemisphere. I've been here now for about 3 weeks and MAN has it flown by! Calandra Miller and I have both been comissioned to design and implement a needs assessment survey over the course of this summer. Project HOPE has about nine Village Savings Fund (VSF) groups set up and are being taught by 3 local volunteer workers (the majority of participants in these groups do not speak English, hence the need for these volunteers). The groups are comprised of about 20 women each, and the purpose is to educate these women on microeconomics. Ultimately, after undergoing the entire education course (which takes about 2 months of one day a week, weekly meetings), these women will have set up amongst themselves a system for both saving and loaning out money to group members. We're about halfway through the program with multiple groups right now, and Calandra and I have been going out with translators to survey these women on their progress. We are also obtaining a baseline survey for the orphans and other vulnerable children (OOVC) under the care of these VSF members with the same survey tool.

World Pneumonia Day?

May 12 2009

Last month, to celebrate World Health Day, a group of organizations and activists launched an effort to encourage the United Nations to declare November 2nd as World Pneumonia Day. Pneumonia which is the leading killer of children around the world taking upwards of 2 million lives of children under 5 every year is rarely discussed in the media as a childhood killer and is often thought of only as a disease of the elderly. In communities around the world, it is often unrecognized and untreated - and simple cases become more severe and more costly to treat. Save the Children Artist Ambassador, Hugh Laurie, commented, "I work on a TV show that features the unusual, the bizarre, the unique. But the cases on House are brightly-colored minnows compared to the leviathan of pneumonia. It's so big, you couldn't make a TV show about it. But you could change it. So could I. We can and must change it."

There is good news on pneumonia on both the prevention and treatment fronts. The advent of new and not so new vaccines being increasingly integrated into immunization programs around the world is critical. GAVI is at the forefront of promoting the integration of these newer vaccines which are effective against two of the leading causes of pneumonia. And, on the treatment side, the increasing recognition of community health workers as a key component of the strategy to more quickly diagnose and provide antibiotic treatment for cases of pneumonia when they do occur is vital to reducing pneumonia deaths. These prevention and treatment efforts have the potential to dramatically cut pneumonia deaths around the
world.

If you want to see the devastating effect of pneumonia on a young child and the simple solution, you can click on the link below to see the story of Karunesh, an Ethiopian infant, lucky enough to have a dedicated and trained community health worker near her village. And Karunesh's story is just one of thousands of children's whose lives are being saved thanks to simple diagnosis and treatment protocols that are being integrated into the training of community health workers in numerous countries around the world.

ONE Campus Challenge |INT'L |USA |

 

 

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World Pneumonia Day?
May 12th, 2009 2:16 PM EST
By ONE.Partners
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Last month, to celebrate World Health Day, a group of organizations and activists launched an effort to encourage the United Nations to declare November 2nd as World Pneumonia Day. Pneumonia which is the leading killer of children around the world taking upwards of 2 million lives of children under 5 every year is rarely discussed in the media as a childhood killer and is often thought of only as a disease of the elderly. In communities around the world, it is often unrecognized and untreated - and simple cases become more severe and more costly to treat. Save the Children Artist Ambassador, Hugh Laurie, commented, "I work on a TV show that features the unusual, the bizarre, the unique. But the cases on House are brightly-colored minnows compared to the leviathan of pneumonia. It's so big, you couldn't make a TV show about it. But you could change it. So could I. We can and must change it."

There is good news on pneumonia on both the prevention and treatment fronts. The advent of new and not so new vaccines being increasingly integrated into immunization programs around the world is critical. GAVI is at the forefront of promoting the integration of these newer vaccines which are effective against two of the leading causes of pneumonia. And, on the treatment side, the increasing recognition of community health workers as a key component of the strategy to more quickly diagnose and provide antibiotic treatment for cases of pneumonia when they do occur is vital to reducing pneumonia deaths. These prevention and treatment efforts have the potential to dramatically cut pneumonia deaths around the
world.

If you want to see the devastating effect of pneumonia on a young child and the simple solution, you can click on the link below to see the story of Karunesh, an Ethiopian infant, lucky enough to have a dedicated and trained community health worker near her village. And Karunesh's story is just one of thousands of children's whose lives are being saved thanks to simple diagnosis and treatment protocols that are being integrated into the training of community health workers in numerous countries around the world.

Finally, the coalition of pneumonia fighters has some new allies - Hedgefunds against Malaria has now become Hedgefunds against Malaria and Pneumonia and they are educating their membership and friends about the toll of these diseases.

More information about pneumonia and the work of organizations trying to stop it dead in its tracks is available at www.worldpneumoniaday.org

-Mary Beth Powers, Survive to 5 Campaign Chief, Save the Children USA


TAGS: Child Survival, NGO Partner, Save The Children, pneumonia

 

 

 

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