Travel helps me better understand and appreciate the world around me.  Public health has become my passion. Follow me as I learn to bring the love of travel and public health together through my Master of Public Health field experience in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

This adventure will begin on March 2nd as I begin my two day trek from East Tennessee State University to my temporary home for two months.  There will be many lessons learned, knowledge gained, and many pictures to share with you throughout this experience.  I look forward to sharing this journey with you.

"One may observe in one's travels to distant countries the feelings of recognition and affiliation that link every human being to every other human being." – Aristotle

At the age of nineteen I scribbled this quote on the inside cover of a journal I kept while interning at an HIV/AIDS clinic in Kampala, Uganda - a one month experience that I, in my naïvety, had assumed would shine light on answers to the world's problems and provide me with direction in my future studies and career choices. Not so shockingly, I returned home with more questions than answers about the all-too-exhaustive list of social injustices in this world and how I could possibly play a role.
The Aspen Institute, an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington DC, holds a monthly speakers luncheon for Congressional staff interested in the various topics related to foreign assistance. Its mission is to foster leadership based on enduring values and to provide a nonpartisan venue for dealing with critical issues.
I have never been so thankful for a shower! I am happy to say that after a two day journey and a lot of jet lag I have made it to Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. I arrived late last night around 3AM here to meet wonderful hosts who welcomed me to this beautiful city. I can honestly say I had no idea what to expect, or what it would look like coming in. I feel very comfortable here so far and have enjoyed walking (not too far) around my apartment.
Since the 1990's, the U.S. foreign aid budget has helped cut global poverty in HALF. Yet, foreign aid comprises less than 1% of the entire U.S. budget. Foreign aid isn't just a humanitarian cause - when global health improves and poverty is eliminated, citizens of the U.S. benefits from greater global security and a thriving global economy.
Hope Through Healing Hands was proud to be a key sponsor this past weekend at the Mobilizing Medical Missions Conference (M3) at Lakewood Church in Houston, TX. At the conference, doctors, nurses, and other global healthcare professionals and advocates gathered from all over the world. Led by Paul Osteen MD, Lakewood hosted over 1,600 people gathering for the inaugural year of the M3 conference. The crowd was charged with the aim to Be Inspired. Connect With Others. Find Your Mission.
Most Americans believe 26% of the U.S. budget is allocated for foreign aid. The reality? Less than 1%. Contrary to popular belief - this is not an altruistic expenditure. The foreign aid budget actually makes the U.S. more prosperous and secure.
In honor of the International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation, we've re-published this essay by James Nardella that originally appeared in The Mother & Child Project: Raising Our Voices For Health And Hope. As a tireless advocate for human rights and women's empowerment, Nardella's essay shows how men must become agents for change when it comes to putting a stop to practices such as FGM that devalue women. It isn't until all humans are treated equally that our world will see an end to poverty and suffering.
Like Dr. Paul Osteen and so many others who dedicate weeks or months of their year to provide clinical care in underserved populations in developing nations, Doctor-Senator Bill Frist has spent over twenty-five years traveling to impoverished, conflict areas with World Medical Mission to provide medical attention where none may exist otherwise.
“I lie awake at night, and I can’t sleep… I’m afraid that if I close my eyes, I won’t wake up,” the gentle Egyptian man I met moments before, a two-time survivor of cancer, shared with me. “I’m worried I haven’t lived well,” he continued. “You know, I haven’t done good things, like you.”

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