Humanitarian photographer Esther Havens tells the incredible story of photographing the mother and baby in Rwanda, that later became the cover photo for The Mother & Child Project. Six years later, Havens returned to Rwanda to see what had become of the mother and baby that had meant so much to her for all these years.
Our last clinic and teaching are back in Limbe! Clinic St. Jean is a large hospital that sees about 250-300 patients a day. The directors wanted the majority of their staff to receive the education, so we did training over two days and taught over 50 providers and nursing students.
A Kenyan nurse anesthetist asked me what it was like to work at Kijabe. After my first week here, I thought, it’s just like being at Vanderbilt, but with less resources and all African patients. The care provided at AIC Kijabe is likely the best in rural Kenya and likely the best care you can receive outside of Nairobi.
Today was a busy but productive and gratifying day! We started the day at Second Mile Haiti ministries. This is a wonderful organization started by two young Americans, one a nurse and the other with a business/engineering background who saw the need for family education with malnourished children. The ministry has several rooms that house malnourished and underdeveloped children, siblings and their moms (sometimes dads!).
Open Door Haiti is a clinic in Limbe that is connected to Open Door Church of God in Cap Haitian. We provided the Standard Days Method of natural family planning training to the providers in both places to help accommodate them and their weekend schedule.
The wonderful organization Hope Through Healing Hands Foundation graciously gave Belmont University a grant to offer a fellowship in global health with a focus on healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies to one of the students in the College of Health Sciences. With my calling to teach natural family planning and my passion for global health, I applied with hopes to expand my knowledge and create the beginnings of my life work, setting up a path for my future.
This is my last week in Guyana and I can truly say that I am going away from this experience as a better clinician. I have been stretched in ways that will serve me well when I return to the States. Not having the luxury of many tests and medicines that I am used to has made me depend more on my physical exam and lean on my Guyanese colleagues to teach my what they do in this resource limited setting.
I have never been to South America. The thought of coming to a new place was exciting but also made me a little nervous. After only a few days here I have quickly realized that the people of Guyana are friendly, generous, and eager to teach outsiders about their culture.

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